Calculating Price for B1G1 1/2 off

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Calculating Price for B1G1 1/2 offWant a quick and easy way for calculating price of an individual item when they’re on sale for “buy one, get one half off” (B1G1* 1/2 off)?

* – don’t get bogged down with all the couponing lingo, refer to this handy dandy glossary!

Here you go. Lets say the sale price is $3.99

Just multiply the sale price by 1.5: [Read more…]

Keep on saving!  :o)
--Barbara

**Remember, y'all, this post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small amount of compensation when you purchase from my links, which I"ll totally blow on waffle fries and sweet tea, y'all!**

Calculating Sales Tax with Coupons

**This post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small amount of compensation when you purchase from my links, which I"ll totally blow on waffle fries and sweet tea, y'all!**



Calculating Sales Tax with CouponsWhen you use coupons, it’s important to understand how sales tax works with manufacture and store coupons.

Consider the following points:

    1. A store is reimbursed by the manufacture for the value of a coupon used. Thus, the store still generates revenue from the couponed item. Therefore, sales tax IS applied to the amount of the coupon.
    2. When you use a store coupon, OR when a store doubles the value of a manufacture’s coupon, the store is NOT reimbursed for that amount. Therefore, the amount for which the store doubles a coupon or the amount of a store coupon is NOT subject to sales tax.

Make sense?  Here are a few examples, to make it crystal clear:

Calculating Sales Tax with Coupons

Let’s set up a scenario, with easy round numbers.

  • Let’s say you are able to take advantage of a 10 for $10 sale at Publix, and you indeed purchase 10 items. Each item is thus priced at $1.00.
  • Let’s further say you are lucky enough to have matching manufacture coupons worth 50¢ for each item. That’s $5.00 in manufacture coupons.
  • If your Publix DOUBLES those coupons, then you’re essentially getting $5.00 in store coupons. (Look at your receipt — it’s always broken up as a separate coupon.)  This scenario would work the exact same way if you had ten Publix coupons for 50¢ off said item.
  • So, your pre-tax total is ZERO. But, because the store will still generate revenue off the $5.00 in manufacture coupons, you’ll be taxed for that amount.
  • Tax around here is 7%; so for me, I would pay $0.35 out of pocket for $10.00 worth of items.

Make sense now?  Want another example?

  • Let’s go to Kroger, where they also have a 10 for $10 sale.  But remember, Kroger doesn’t double coupons anymore.
  • Let’s say you buy 10 items for $1 each.
  • And again, you have 10 manufacture coupons for 50¢ each.  Therefore, you have $5 in manufacture’s coupons.
  • So for $10 worth of items, you pay $5 plus tax.
  • Since you don’t tax the amount of a manufacture coupon, you pay $5 plus 35¢ in tax (assuming tax is 7%).
  • For $10 worth of items, you ‘ll pay $5.35 after coupons and taxes.

Ok, one more example:

  • Take those handy-dandy Bed Bath and Beyond coupons.  There are generally two kinds: 20% off or $5 off.
  • In either scenario, since it is a store coupon, you are taxed AFTER the couponed amount.
  • So, if you buy an item at BBB for $100, and use a 20% off coupon (please, oh, please don’t ever buy something from there without a 20% off coupon!!), you are taxed the post-coupon amount of $80.
  • In the most of the metro Atlanta area, that means you’ll pay 7% tax, or $5.60.

Disclaimer: this is most certainly the case in the state of Georgia. I cannot speak for any state elsewhere. However, I would imagine the same principles would apply. There are some areas where sales tax is lowered or not applicable to food and medicine.  Any out of staters who can verify or deny this, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂

Keep on saving!  :o)
--Barbara

**Remember, y'all, this post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small amount of compensation when you purchase from my links, which I"ll totally blow on waffle fries and sweet tea, y'all!**

Kroger Clearance Hair Care Money Makers!

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Run -don’t walk!- to Kroger. As always, I perused through the clearance section of my Kroger yesterday, and was super-delighted with what I found.  (Y’all, seriously, always check the Kroger clearance section.  Check against the coupon database to see if you can stretch your dollar further.  Always!)

I just snagged some super-cheap hair care products.  And because I paired them with coupons, I scored super well!  When I was there earlier, these products were still there.  I cannot guarantee these items will be at your Kroger or that they’ll be on clearance at your store – just wanted to share, in case they are for you, too. (If they are, please let me know!)

Kroger Clear Shampoo ClearanceMost impressively, yes, I made money off these!  I used this: $2.50/1 Clear Scalp & Hair Product, exp. 2/23/14 (RP 01/26/14).

Kroger Clearance John FriedaWOO HOO!  9¢ a piece after coupons…  This is what I used: $3/2 Any two John Frieda Products, exp 3/1/14 (SS1/19/14)

Kroger Suave clearanceAaand more 9¢ conditioner.  Not too shabby!  I used this coupon: $2.50/1 Clear Scalp & Hair Product, exp. 2/23/14 (RP 01/26/14)  You can also use this printable version here or here.

Let me know if you find any of these deals at your Kroger.  And check out the coupon database for more great coupons, and the printable coupon center!

Keep on saving!  :o)
--Barbara

**Remember, y'all, this post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small amount of compensation when you purchase from my links, which I"ll totally blow on waffle fries and sweet tea, y'all!**

Glossary of Frugal Terms

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Glossary of Frugal Terms

Here you will find my handy-dandy glossary of frugal terms.  You’ve probably heard the lingo, or seen it on many frugal/coupon blogs, but weren’t quite sure of it’s meaning.  Look no further.  I’ve also included some “text talk” that I’ve seen over the last few years crop up more and more in daily use.  And if you don’t see a frugal term, contact me, and I’ll add it.  🙂

A

AR – After Rebate
AYOR – At Your Own Risk

B

B1G1 or BOGO – Buy One Get One Free
B5G1 – Buy FIVE Get One Free
BC/AC – Before/After Coupons
Blinkie – SmartSource machine with a red blinking light on it. Coupons are thus referred to as ‘ Blinkies’
BTFE – Box Tops for Education

C [Read more…]

Keep on saving!  :o)
--Barbara

**Remember, y'all, this post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small amount of compensation when you purchase from my links, which I"ll totally blow on waffle fries and sweet tea, y'all!**

Unit Price, Unit Price, Unit Price!!!

**This post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small amount of compensation when you purchase from my links, which I"ll totally blow on waffle fries and sweet tea, y'all!**



Unit Price Explained
I have discovered that many people do not take unit price in to account when attempting to shop savvily.  (Did I just make up a new word?!!)  So for my fellow frugal shoppers, or my frugal-shoppers-in-training, let me explain the value in knowing the unit price of an item you wish to purchase, or are pondering purchasing.
 

What the heck is a unit price??




The unit price is the price you pay per unit of measurement.  It can be the price per ounce, price per pound, price per diaper, price per napkin…..  get it?  Let’s use a bottle of ketchup for this example.  Say, you have the SALE price for a 20 oz bottle of ketchup, being $3.00*.  In order to find the unit price, you divide the price by the number of ounces.  In this case, $3.00 divided by 20, which equals $0.15.  At most grocery stores, the unit price will be listed next to the sale price.
 
 
 

Why is the unit price important?

 
In order to get the most for your money, that handy-dandy unit price can prove quite helpful when trying to decide between two brands, two sizes, etc.  Let’s take that ketchup, for example, again.  Say you have another bottle of ketchup, perhaps a 50 oz. bottle of catsup (WOAH!) for $5.00.  Which would be a better deal: the 20 oz bottle or the 50 oz bottle?  If the unit prices aren’t listed, whip out your calculator and see: $5.00 divided by 50 = $0.10.  The unit price for the larger bottle is less. But here’s where it gets tricky.  Say the grocery store is running a BOGO** sale for the 20 oz bottle.  Then, you would be getting DOUBLE the ketchup (40 oz.) for $3.00.  Is that a better deal?  Do the math to see: $3.00 divided by 40 = $0.075.  In this case, the two bottles are a better deal than the one big bottle.
 
Does the unit price change when using coupons?
 
When you have a coupon to factor in to the equation, it does change the unit price for said item.  But, with a quick zip of the calculator (or your wonderful math-friendly brain), you can determine the better deal.  Sticking with our ketchup bottles, let’s play with a few scenarios. First, let’s say you have a coupon for $0.50 off 2 bottles (which means $0.25 off each bottle).  Calculate the unit price for the two 20 ounce bottles.  $6.00 – $0.50 = $5.50.  So, $5.50 divided by 40 oz = $0.13.  The unit price for two 50 oz bottles at $5.00 each:  $10.00 ($5 x 2) – $0.50 = $9.50.  $9.50 divided by 50 oz = $0.19.  So, again, the unit price for the two smaller bottles would be a better deal. Second, let’s say you have the same $0.50 off coupon for two bottles, along with a BOGO sale.  Go back to the original sale price for one, take off the coupon, and divide.  So the two 20 oz bottles would be $3.00 minus $0.50, making them $2.50.  Divded by 40 oz, gives you a unit price of $0.0625.  And for the two 50 oz bottles: $5.00 – $0.50 = $4.50/100 = $0.045.  So, in this case, the BOGO and coupon work best with the bigger bottles.
 

I Still Don’t Get It!?  Gimme some more examples!!

 
Couldn’t catch up using the ketchup and catsup?  Read on, fellow Frugallers to get another explanation…
 
Since unit price isn’t always available on items (like diapers), you’ll need to be able to calculate the unit price on your own.  Check out this scenario, using unit price and coupons: First, let’s say that a certain brand of diapers comes in two different packages: the “jumbo” or the “mega” pack.  The “Jumbo” holds 40 diapers for $8.99; the Mega holds 80 for $17.99.  Which is the better deal??  The unit prices would be as follows: “Jumbo”: $8.99/40 = $0.225 (rounded off)  That means you pay roughly 23 cents per diaper. “Mega”: $17.99/80 = $0.225 (rounded off)  That means you pay roughly 23 cents per diaper. In this case, you’ll pay about the same.  However…..
 
But what about coupons?  This certain brand often has $3.00 coupons floating around.  So let’s play with that:  “Jumbo”: $8.99 – $3.00 = $5.99 / 40 = $0.149 unit price (a little under 15 cents per diaper) “Mega”: $17.99 – $3.00 = 14.99 / 80 = $0.187 unit price (a little under 19 cents per diaper) So, in this case, the coupon makes the difference: the smaller size is the better deal.
 

Unit Price: The bottom line

 
My point in sharing this wonderful math knowledge is to show you that, sometimes the advertised deals are not always the best deals out there!  With some quick math, you can find the best deals for your money by finding the true unit price on the products you’re considering for purchase.  When all coupons, BOGOs, and other deals are factored in, comparing the TRUE unit prices can really show you where the REAL deals are!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
*Prices and units of measure are rounded off to nice, even number here, because I’m just not that math-savy today.  (Except for the price of diapers, that is forever ingrained in my brain!)
 
**BOGO = Buy One, Get One [Free]
Keep on saving!  :o)
--Barbara

**Remember, y'all, this post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small amount of compensation when you purchase from my links, which I"ll totally blow on waffle fries and sweet tea, y'all!**

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